Japan art and Bakufu Ohno: Birds and farmhouses

Japan art and Bakufu Ohno: Birds and farmhouses

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The Japanese artist Bakufu Ohno (Ono) was born during the early modernization period in Japan. Hence, Ohno was born in 1888 during the Meiji Period (1868-1912) and died in 1976 when the cityscapes – and way of life – had changed dramatically.

He produced a diverse range of Japanese art. However, in this art piece, the focus is on birds and farmhouses depicted by Ohno. These art pieces were completed between 1949 and 1953.

In the above image, two children are playing in front of the home. The full moon of Autumn is illuminating the sky. Hence, a villager is depicted making an offering (dumplings and pampas grass) connected to “Ju-go Ya.”

The two farmhouse scenes provide a sense of tranquility during a time of rapid change. Thus, irrespective of whether the two art pieces are focused solely on the countryside – or are partly a rural escape from the onset of rapid modernization – both art pieces work a treat.

The power of nature and how humans interact in the countryside shine brightly in the art of Ohno. Hence, the farmhouses provide a serene way of life during a time of rapid change within all major cities in Japan.

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