Japan art and Kajita Hanko: Elegant ladies and flowers

Japan art and Kajita Hanko: Elegant ladies and flowers

Lee Jay Walker

Modern Tokyo Times

The Japanese artist Kajita Hanko was born in 1870 and died in the Taisho period. He produced many stunning art pieces of elegant-looking ladies. Often, flowers were in the same art pieces to provide a warm feeling of tranquility and beauty. 

In the first art piece, a very stylish lady is enjoying the iris part of the garden. Her clothes provide a very graceful scene – where the flow of beauty, fashion, flowers, and the delightful garden fuse naturally.

The British Museum says, “Son of a metal engraver (previous generations had been keepers of the shogun’s hawks). In his youth, said to have supplemented the family’s meager earnings by painting fans and handkerchiefs for export. Studied with Nabeta Gyokuei and Ohara Koson (q.v.). During the late 1880s worked as a designer for the Kiryu Kosho Gaisha in Yokohama. In the 1890s took interest in Nihonga1897-1905 produced many illustrations for newspapers and magazines such as Bungei Kurabu and Shin Shosetsu.”

In the second art piece, a Chinese lady in red is leaning against the trunk of a plum tree that is blossoming. She looks so refined in her red top and the drape of the green cloth that fuses beautifully. 

In the last art piece, another elegant-looking lady is enjoying the beauty of flowers. Hence, he passed on his artistic skills to many future artists. These artists include Togyo Okumura, Kokei Kobayashi, and Seison Maeda.

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